Wednesday, October 23rd, 2019 - Verbalize Science

Projection mapping technology enhances the appearance of buildings, artworks, cars, and more.

The problem this research is tackling is how multiple projectors can be automatically stitched together to operate as one.

Dr Ross Smith has developed a new automatic projector calibration system that is used to turn irregular objects into a display surface for video projection. The research developed a new hardware solution to support the calibration process, to provide a more precise alignment with a new sub-pixel calibration algorithm.

We'd love to commercialize our solution with projector manufacturers, projective mapping software companies, or anyone who needs to stitch multiple projectors to create one coherent screen.

The audio story (for quotes) and video from this work can be found on verbalize.science = https://verbalize.science/talk_page/1564118228929x642382590220697600

Video explainer here = https://youtu.be/dOnbvYFaaJs

 

About verbalize.science

This science story was created on verbalize.science. The world’s first web platform that enables scientists to tell their research stories in their own words. We produce engaging video abstracts for use by journalists and publishers to increase the influence of science. 

 For more information contact Dr Andy Stapleton from verbalize.science on [email protected] 

 

Scientist contact details

Dr Ross Smith = https://people.unisa.edu.au/ross.t.smith

 

This research is part of UniSA Ventures commercialisation program:

UniSA Ventures is the technology commercialisation and investment management company of the University of South Australia (UniSA). We work with UniSA staff and students to protect and manage the results of their research.

Contact Profile

Andrew Stapleton

M: Twitter @VerbalizeSci
W: verbalize.science/

Keywords

Projection mapping technology enhances the appearance of buildings, artworks, cars, and more.

Categories

Newsrooms

Sharing

More Formats