Monday, November 17th, 2014 - Roy Morgan Research

Around 1 in 8 Australians aged 14+ (12%, or almost 2.4 million) go to at least one concert within an average three month period—whether for rock, pop, jazz, blues or classical music-compared with 11% going to a professional sports event, data from Roy Morgan Research shows.

Helix Personas has segmented Australians into seven distinct communities based on shared attitudes, behaviours and demographics. People in the Metrotech community of young, trendy and often high-earning urbanites are, perhaps not surprisingly, by far the most likely to have seen a concert recently (21%), ahead of Leading Lifestyles (15%), Aussie Achievers or Today’s Families (11%), Getting By (10%), Golden Years (9%) or Battlers (8%).

However while you might assume Metrotechs are much more inclined toward rock and pop, around 40% of Metrotech concert-goers went to a jazz, blues and classical concert—the highest proportion of all communities. Instead, the outer suburban young parents in Today’s Families or multigenerational and multicultural family members in Getting By are each almost five times more likely to go see rock or pop than jazz, blues or classical music.  

% of Helix Community who go to a concert in an average three month period:

Source: Roy Morgan Single Source, July 2013 – June 2014, sample = 16,809 Australians 14+

Rock or pop concert-goers are almost 50% more likely than the average Australian to agree they wear clothes that will get them noticed, 35% more likely to buy a product because of the label, and 29% more likely to enjoy being with a crowd of people—but are 39% less likely to regularly go to church or other place of worship.

Those who went to a jazz, blues or classical concert are 71% more likely than average to drink wine with their meals, 60% more likely to consider themselves ‘a bit of an intellectual’, and 40% more likely to say they try to buy organic food.

But funnily enough, attendees at a rock or pop concert are actually almost 20% more likely than those at a jazz, blues or classical concert to think obedience and respect for authority are the most important values children should learn.

Norman Morris, Industry Communications Director, Roy Morgan Research, says:

“More Australians go to a concert within an average three months than go to a professional sporting event. However those identified as Today’s Families or Aussie Achievers are more likely to go see live sport than live music.

“Clearly the biggest fans of live music, Metrotechs are not only more likely to have gone to a concert at all, but they go more often and are more likely to see music across different genres. 

“Helix Personas provides the ability to understand and home in on target markets more accurately and effectively than ever before. Everyone from concert promoters to ticketing outlets would do well to get a firm knowledge of the underlying attitude and behaviours (as well as favourite brands and preferred media) of those most likely to attend an event.”    

 

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Roy Morgan Research


Roy Morgan Research is Australia’s best known and longest established market research and public opinion survey company. Roy Morgan Single Source is thorough, accurate, and provides comprehensive, directly applicable information about current and future customers. It is unique in that it directs all the questions to each individual from a base survey sample of around 55,000 interviews in Australia and 15,000 interviews in New Zealand annually - the largest Single Source databases in the world. The questions asked relate to lifestyle and attitudes, media consumption habits (including TV, radio, newspapers, magazines, cinema, catalogues, pay TV and the Internet), brand and product usage, purchase intentions, retail visitations, service provider preferences, financial information and recreation and leisure activities. This lead product is supported by a nationally networked, consultancy-orientated market research capability.
Shaun Ellis
P: 03 9224 5332
W: www.roymorgan.com

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