Friday, March 14th, 2014

The University of Adelaide’s winemaking and viticulture students are benefiting from the expertise of two winemakers from overseas visiting the Waite campus this month.
Mr Even Bakke, owner and winemaker at Clos de Trias in the Ventoux region in Southern France, is this year’s Walter, Carew and Richard Reynell Fellow and is helping broaden the students’ experience and exposure to international winemaking practices and wine styles.
The Caillard family established the Walter, Carew and Richard Reynell Fellowship in 1975 to honour the contribution of the Reynells to Australian winemaking and to perpetuate the memory of two sons tragically lost through two World Wars.
The Fellowship underpins the Visiting Winemaker program at the University of Adelaide. A winemaker of high standing and typically from outside of Australia spends up to four weeks working with the University’s oenology and viticulture students.
“As well as advising students during the planning and execution of their practical winemaking projects, the Visiting Winemaker conducts extensive tastings of international wines for students and staff and meets with the Australian wine industry,” says Dr Paul Grbin, Senior Lecture in Oenology. 
Mr Bakke is originally from California and worked extensively in the Napa Valley, before purchasing Clos de Trias in 2007.
At the same time, another winemaker from the Ventoux region is also undertaking a sabbatical at the University of Adelaide’s teaching winery.
Mr James Wood is the winemaker for Domain Vintur and has more than 20 years’ experience in the wine trade, both on the retail and production side.  He has worked in New Zealand, France, Germany and the United Kingdom.
Together the visiting winemakers are working with 3rd year and Masters students in the Viticulture and Oenology programs.  All these students are undertaking red winemaking projects in the University’s winery.
“The contribution of the Walter, Carew and Richard Reynell Fellowship to the University of Adelaide, Viticulture and Oenology programs here at the Waite campus is highly significant, as it provides the students an important international viewpoint on grapegrowing and winemaking,” Dr Grbin says.
“It allows our students as well as staff to gain a detailed insight into different regions around the world.
“The program, which started in 1976, is enriching the education of the next generation of winemakers as well as showcasing to the Visiting Fellow, the wine industry in South Australia.”

Media Contacts:

Dr Paul Grbin
Senior Lecturer in Oenology
School of Agriculture, Food and Wine
The University of Adelaide


University of Adelaide Press Release


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