Monday, January 20th, 2014 - Roy Morgan Research

Is being Australian now about driving your Korean-made car to an Irish pub for a Belgian beer?

Despite a healthy majority (71%) of the Australian population agreeing that they try to buy Australian-made as often as possible, it’s not always easy for them to put their money where their mouth is, as locally produced items become less widespread.

The most die-hard, patriotic consumers are the older generations such as Pre- and Baby Boomers, with more than eight out of 10 saying they try to buy Aussie-made products.

The younger generations are less likely to agree, with under half of Gen Z agreeing they try to buy Australian made (49%).

Agree they try to buy Australian-made products as often as possible

Aussie-made-by-generation

Source: Roy Morgan Single Source (Australia), October 2012 – September 2013, Australians 14+ n= 19,585; Gen Z n=4,571, Gen Y n=3,286, Gen X n=4,172, Baby-Boomers n=6062, Pre-Boomers n=4571

Warren Reid, Group Account Manager – Consumer Products, Roy Morgan Research, says:

Over the last decade we’ve seen many Australian-owned brands close their doors, or be sold to overseas companies. Even manufacturing from local heritage brand Holden (ironically enough, owned by US company General Motors for 80-plus years) is soon to disappear entirely overseas.

 

“In our increasingly globalised society, the classic ‘True-Blue’ Aussie spirit is not as pervasive (or influential) as it once was, particularly among the younger generations who’ve grown up accustomed to a marketplace where Australian-made is just one of many options. Whether it’s mobile phones, clothing or household items, most are labelled as being made overseas.

 

 “Far from consciously deciding to avoid buying Australian-made, younger generations are often given no choice: the type of products they buy just aren’t manufactured here (or if they are, they’re more expensive). This is especially pertinent when considering the younger generation’s enthusiasm for high-tech items such as Apple products

“The segments of the population most likely to buy Australian-made wherever possible not only tend to be older, but often live in rural areas. Roy Morgan’s in-depth profiling tool Helix Personas shows that mature country-dwellers such as Rural RewardsCountry Conservative and Rural Traditionalists rate highly in this respect.

 

 “With Australia Day around the corner, it’s a good time for all of us to think about the products we’re buying: where they’re manufactured, and whether there’s a locally made alternative. The ‘Australian Made’ logo is always a good indicator; their website is also a useful reference for consumers keen to buy local goods.”

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Roy Morgan Research is Australia's best known and longest established market research and public opinion survey company. Roy Morgan Single Source is thorough, accurate, and provides comprehensive, directly applicable information about current and future customers. It is unique in that it directs all the questions to each individual from a base survey sample of around 55,000 interviews in Australia and 15,000 interviews in New Zealand annually - the largest Single Source databases in the world. The questions asked relate to lifestyle and attitudes, media consumption habits (including TV, radio, newspapers, magazines, cinema, catalogues, pay TV and the Internet), brand and product usage, purchase intentions, retail visitations, service provider preferences, financial information and recreation and leisure activities. This lead product is supported by a nationally networked, consultancy-orientated market research capability.
Samantha Wilson
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Keywords

retail, australian made, generation y, generation z, baby boomers, consumers

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