Sunday, January 1st, 2012 - Media Spokesperson for Christian Science in Queensland
The ‘Health Story of the Year’ hasn’t made it into the mainstream media much at all, suggests online moderator of Croakey, Melissa Sweet. “It is the impact of social media upon health and health care”, she states, backing this up with some interesting references.

I agree that there are immense benefits from the use of social media for both the health practitioner and patient. Sweet’s potential benefits list points to the importance of the dissemination of information whereby ideas are shared and exchanged in a spirit of openness and transparency, the opportunity for mass input to ideas and decision-making, and opportunities for other than mainstream allopathic treatment to be discussed.

Being a regular social media user I’ve discovered that there is a great interest by the public in complementary and alternative medicines (CAM). I’ve easily been able to find statistics on their use in Australia: around ¾ of medical professionals use CAM (Wikipedia definition) along with pharmaceuticals; and 75% of Australians were using CAMS in 2005.

While searching for this information online I discovered a large body of clinical research findings on the positive affects of spirituality and religion on health; knowledge that would have been hard to come by in non-academic circles in the 1990s. I’ve also discovered that medical practitioners and nurses in Australia are more than willing to talk about these effects and to share personal experiences, not just online but with me personally.

I love the moment by moment sharing of links to research, opinion, and news reports via Twitter. Ignorance, prejudice, the loudest and most aggressive voice, or financial backing, no longer win discussions when they are conducted online. We are all equal and able to be heard when using social media.

For instance, check out this inspiring video on YouTube: “The Shocking Truth about Your Health”. The ‘truth’ is that caring for your body is the least important part of healthcare, states Lissa Rankin, MD in a recent TEDx talk (a TEDx talk is organised either internationally or locally as an “idea worth spreading”). According to Rankin, our body is a mirror of how we live our lives – lives that must include healthy relationships, a healthy professional life, creative expression, being spiritually connected, being healthy financially and environmentally, and mental health. Our thoughts are just as important as our bodies and needs, if not more. (If you have 18 minutes to spare to view the video, it may be worth your time, and you can then add your comment, for or against her opinions).

The newest frontier in medicine, the amazing effects of spirituality on health, is demonstrating how important thought is to experience – and is the next step to putting into practice our understanding of the mind/body connection.

There are statistics that show that millions of people have used prayer or meditation as an adjunct to healing. I find that prayer is not only an adjunct to healing, as I have relied on prayer as my only medicine for over 25 years now. Prayer needs to be a daily exercise (if not moment by moment) and includes affirmations of my exact likeness to the divine and it uncovers what is ‘uncool’ in my thinking and needs to be changed. As a result I’ve experienced healings of a financial nature, relationship issues, pain and sickness, grief, and infertility.

Investigate what’s available and being discussed via social media on the subject of spirituality and health and we may just find that it tops the Health Story of the Year for 2012.

Contact Profile

Media Spokesperson for Christian Science in Queensland


I look for opportunities to provide a spiritual perspective to current events, offer findings on current scientific research in the field of spirituality and health, and give accurate information to the public about Christian Science and its founder Mary Baker Eddy.
Kay Stroud
P: 0400494406
W: www.kaystroud.wordpress.com

Keywords

mind/body connection, health, healthcare, 2011, 2012, Melissa Sweet, social media, spirituality, CAM

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