Friday, October 28th, 2011 - Roy Morgan Research
As Americans hit the stores for Halloween, candy retailers will be hoping this year is better than last Halloween. Roy Morgan Research found that fewer American households last year bought Halloween candy than before the recession – down to 29% last Halloween.

Halloween buying habits of Americans also changed with the recession. Last Halloween, more households purchased candy at store sales or at a reduced price (56%, up from 52% in 2007). And at the same time, households also purchased more small Halloween candy items (9 items, up from 7 items in 2007) and fewer big items (2 items, down from 3 items in 2007).

Last Halloween, Hershey was the most popular Halloween candy with 29 % of households buying it. Other popular Halloween candy were Reece’s (13%), Snickers (11%), Kit Kat (7%) and M&M’s (6%).

Chart: Incidence of Halloween buyers in 2010 compared to 2007

Source: Roy Morgan International, n=2,106.

Almost 40% of all Halloween candy purchasing was done by those aged 50-64. These purchasers represent 15% (7.4 million) of those aged 50-64. 12% of those aged over 65 (3.3 million) bought Halloween candy followed by 9 % of those aged 35-49 (5.6 million).

If we were to draw a pen portrait of a Halloween candy buyer, she is more likely to be a woman, aged between 50 and 64 years, a homemaker in a relatively affluent household.

The Halloween candy buyer is also more likely to believe “Helping others is an important part of who I am” and is more optimistic about America and the US economy than other Americans, agreeing with “I’m optimistic about the future”, “The American economy appears to be improving” and “I feel financially stable at the moment”. In terms of shopping for products, the Halloween candy buyer is into bargains and samples – agreeing with: “I like to try the free samples they offer in supermarkets”, “I try to buy American made products as much as possible” and “I go out of my way in search of a bargain”.

Portia Morgan, Vice President Business Development at Roy Morgan International says:

“The Roy Morgan profile on Halloween Candy Buyers provides rich detail about the daily lives, activities, financial situation and media usage of Halloween Candy Buyers. For example, as well as being older and female, Halloween Candy Buyers are more likely to read the newspaper and magazines and less likely to be heavy radio listeners than other Americans. These insights can help target the key purchasers in Halloween marketing campaigns.”

These findings are just the latest in a series of special consumer profiles from Roy Morgan International. This consumer product profile survey was conducted with 2,181 Americans in April 2011. The profiles, including attitudes and behaviors were matched to previously collected Halloween purchasing data in 2010 and 2007. The Roy Morgan American consumer panel has tracked the same households' Halloween purchases since 2005.

A comprehensive profile on Halloween Candy Buyers includes their demographics, attitudes, activities and media consumption.

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Roy Morgan Research

Roy Morgan Research is Australia’s best known and longest established market research and public opinion survey company.

Roy Morgan Single Source is thorough, accurate, and provides comprehensive, directly applicable information about current and future customers. It is unique in that it directs all the questions to each individual from a base survey sample of around 55,000 interviews in Australia and 15,000 interviews in New Zealand annually - the largest Single Source databases in the world. The questions asked relate to lifestyle and attitudes, media consumption habits (including TV, radio, newspapers, magazines, cinema, catalogues, pay TV and the Internet), brand and product usage, purchase intentions, retail visitations, service provider preferences, financial information and recreation and leisure activities. This lead product is supported by a nationally networked, consultancy-orientated market research capability.

Vaishali Nagaratnam
P: 0392245309


Americans hit the stores for Halloween



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