Wednesday, July 8th, 2009 - World Vision
Australian women have a more positive attitude than Aussie men when it comes to fighting world poverty, according to the latest survey findings from World Vision.

While almost two thirds of women believe that everyday Australians can help raise the living standards of the world’s poorest people, only half of all men share these hopeful sentiments.

The survey also found that 80 per cent of Australian women believe that charity organisations make a long-term difference to the world’s poorest people.

The findings come as part of a national call to action from World Vision, urging Australians to take up the World Vision Family Challenge this winter by becoming a child sponsor.

David Lam from Brunswick, Victoria sponsors a child from Guatemala through the World Vision Child Sponsorship program. He encourages men to be more aware of the positives changes they could make by participating in child sponsorship and supporting children living in some of the world’s poorest communities.

“Sponsoring a child with World Vision is one of the most simple, yet rewarding things I have ever done and I really think more men should do it,” David said. “Child sponsorship has made me realise what a small effort it takes to change somebody’s life for the better.”

The study showed that women are also more inclined to convert their beliefs into action in the fight against world poverty, with women making up the 65 per cent majority of Australian World Vision child sponsors.

Bronwyn Gilmore, a World Vision child sponsor from Lilydale, Victoria said she hoped the survey findings would encourage Australian men to raise the bar and bump up their contribution in the fight against global poverty.

“Imagine the difference that could be made to these communities if the boys took up the World Vision Family Challenge to increase their numbers of child sponsors,” Bronwyn said.

Seventy-five per cent of all Australians believe that charity organisations make a long-term difference with the world’s poorest people.

World Vision Chief Executive Officer Tim Costello says child sponsorship gives community-minded Aussies the opportunity to turn their beliefs into action.

“World Vision Child Sponsorship allows every day Australians to help change the lives of children living in poverty – and their communities – in places such as Asia, Africa and Latin America,” Mr Costello said.

“The cost of child sponsorship is the difference between taking your family to the movies or renting a DVD, and the positive impact it has on a child’s future and their wider community is priceless. Child sponsorship is without doubt, one of the most worthwhile things you’ll ever do.”

With the support of thousands of people across Australia, World Vision helped almost 12 million people and funded 603 projects in 66 countries last year.

World Vision encourages all Australians to sponsor a child today and become part of a nationwide challenge to make a difference to the thousands of children living in poverty across the world.

The cost of child sponsorship is just $43 per month. Each sponsor receives an annual progress report about their child and its community’s development. This journey is key to child sponsorship and the focus of World Vision’s work. Families and individuals can sign up for child sponsorship online at www.worldvision.com.au or by calling World Vision on 13 32 40.

Findings are from Roy Morgan research commissioned by World Vision.

HOW THE SEXES MATCH UP


Can everyday people can help to raise living standards amongst the world's poorest people:
          Men (yes) - 49.8 per cent
          Women (yes) - 59.7 per cent


Can charity organisations can make long-term differences to the world's poorest people:
          Men (yes) - 71.5 per cent
          Women (yes) - 79.7 per cent


The Australian government should increase overseas aid to help reduce global poverty:
          Men (yes) - 51.6 per cent
          Women (yes) - 50.4 per cent


- Ends –

 

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Dana Nikanpour

P: 0386431635
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W: www.worldvision.com.au/

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Survey findings from World Vision have revealed that while almost two thirds of women believe that everyday Australians can help raise the living standards of the world’s poorest people, only half of all men agreed. Women comprise 65 per cent of World Vis

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